NeighborWorks® of Grays Harbor contributes to the community conversation on housing issues through a weekly column in the Daily World titled "Nailing it Down."

 

 Since 1999, the "Nailing it Down"articles have been published in the Daily World and other countywide weekly newspapers. NeighborWorks® of Grays Harbor County has collaborated with local newspapers, elected officials and local experts to publish articles covering hundreds of topics.

 

 

Nailing It Down

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November 29, 2017

 $400,000

Available to all Incomes

Gorgeous New View home with Interior design by Grays Harbor College Carpentry class

Recently we’ve had a bit of stormy weather and some power outages around the Harbor.

One of the many things we can be grateful for around here is how reliable (and relatively cheap) our energy supply is compared to the rest of the world.

However, a powerful windstorm, as well as other weather conditions or natural disasters still occasionally interrupt the smooth power supply – and therefore our lives.

We’ve talked a lot recently about what to do to prepare for a power outage, but it’s been a while since we’ve passed along tips on what to do after it’s actually gone out.

Once again we looked to our local PUD as the power – and power out – experts. Here’s what they suggest to do when the power goes out.

WHEN POWER IS OUT

  • If your power is out, check to see if other houses in your neighborhood are dark too. If it’s just your house, first check your service panel or breaker box for tripped breakers or blown fuses before calling the PUD.

  • If the power is out in your area, use your landlin...

Well, this past week threw a bunch of weather our way! Nothing like a windstorm with driving rain and plenty of power outages to get one’s attention!

After this series of storms it’s hard to know where to begin– we have so much to talk about!

Handing out kudos for a job well done is as good a place to start as any.

THANKS PUD, CITY, COUNTY CREWS

In Grays Harbor, we are so fortunate to have so many well trained and hard-working PUD employees, and city and county crews.

Thanks to all for the extra hours in the often miserable, dangerous conditions to make our houses, cities and county safer and more comfortable! It was a job well done this week, working hard to keep up with the aftermath of several storms!

City and county crews were busy clearing roads and streets, cleaning out storm drains to help prevent flooding, and helping out in a variety of ways.

On Monday alone some 10,000 households were without power in Grays Harbor, everywhere from South Beach to Moclips, Lake Quinault, Elma, Central...

We can sometimes take our safe, heated homes for granted — that is, until the power goes out or something goes awry.

For the past few weeks, we’ve been singing the praises of heat pumps — ductless heat pumps in particular. However, if you are not currently planning to change your heat system, you need to know how to deal with what you have to safely heat your house this winter.

Here is some maintenance and safety advice for several kinds of heat sources:

WOOD STOVES AND FIREPLACES

Fireplaces are not intended to heat a home, but most folks like to use them now and then.

Those who use a wood stove to heat or partially heat their home also need to listen up: Make sure you have your chimney inspected and cleaned every year to prevent creosote buildup.

Burning dry wood keeps the creosote down, and storing that wood 25 feet or more from your living space can help keep the insects out.

With the holiday season around the corner, be thinking ahead if you will have any young visitors (or perhaps unstea...

We can sometimes take our safe, heated homes for granted. That is, until the power goes out or something goes awry!

The last few weeks we’ve been singing the praises of heat pumps – ductless heat pumps, in particular. However if you are not currently planning to change your heat system, you need to know how to deal with what you have to safely heat your house this winter

Here is some maintenance and safety advice for several kinds of heat sources.

WOOD STOVES, FIREPLACES

Fireplaces are not intended or built to heat a home, but most folks like to use them none and then.

Those who use a woodstove to heat their home or partially heat it, also need to listen up: Make sure you have your chimney inspected and cleaned every year to prevent creosote buildup.

Burning dry wood keeps the creosote down and keeping that wood 25 feet from your living space, if possible, can help keep the insects out.

With the holiday season around the corner, be thinking ahead if you will have any young visitors (or perhap...

Did you know that keeping your home healthy is important to maintaining your health? But there are specific things your house has to have to be able to support your day-to-day health needs.

Among them are the ability to properly vent moisture, to maintain heating and cooling, the ability to keep you clean and safely dispose of your waste and the ability to protect you from anything outside your door.

Where these needs meet yours is where housing meets health. We want to share a series on each of these over the next few weeks.

CONTROLLING HUMIDITY

Let’s start with talking about indoor air quality. Moisture is good for plants along with mold and mildew when it is allowed to be above 50 percent humidity, especially in rooms of your house that are rarely or scantly heated.

Temperatures in the 50 degree and less range support unhealthy molds and mildews, indoors or out. If you can smell mildew in the house, then you may have mold/mildew spore or other air quality issues.

Maybe you are just used t...

Did you know that keeping your home healthy is important to maintaining your health?

There are specific things your house needs to be able to support your day-to-day health needs. Among them are the ability to properly vent moisture, to maintain heating and cooling, to keep you clean, to safely dispose of your waste, and to protect you from anything outside your door.

Where these needs meet yours is where housing meets health. We want to share a series on each of these over the next few weeks.

CONTROLLING HUMIDITY

Let’s start with talking about indoor air quality. Moisture is good for plants, along with mold and mildew when the humidity is allowed to surpass 50 percent, especially in rooms of your house that are rarely or minimally heated.

Temperatures below 50 degrees support unhealthy molds and mildews, indoors and out. If you can smell mildew in the house, then you may have mold/mildew spore or other air quality issues.

Maybe you are just used to being ill or coughing and sneezing with a...

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710 E. Market Street 
Aberdeen, WA 98520

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360-533-7828 phone 
360-533-7851 fax

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